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Home » Policy & Funding » OSPI Reports to the Legislature

OSPI Reports to the Legislature

The state Legislature assigns work to OSPI through legislation. Oftentimes, the assigned work concludes in a report back to the Legislature describing what OSPI has done, data collected, next steps, and at times, recommendations. 

Reports going back to 2015 are included below. If the report title says "Update," it means the Legislature requires OSPI to submit more than one report on the topic. 

2019

Staffing Enrichment Workgroup Recommendations

In Washington, the state is required to pay for a basic education for every student in grades K–12 residing within the state's borders. In 2010, the Legislature adopted a prototypical funding model to do this. In 2017, the Legislature required OSPI to pull together a technical workgroup to recommend improvements to the funding model that will close opportunity gaps. This report contain's the workgroup's recommendations.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.400.007

UPDATE: The State of Native Education

In the 2018-19 school year, Washington's schools served more than 61,000 public school students that identified as American Indian/Alaskan Native (AI/AN). The Office of Native Education, housed within OSPI, supports AI/AN students as they achieve education goals and standards while supporting cultural identity. This report includes the Office's accomplishments from the 2018-19 school year.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.300.105 

UPDATE: Schools Implementing the Community Eligibility Provision

The federal Community Eligibility Provision (CEP) allows schools with high numbers of students whose families are low-income to serve free breakfast and lunch to all students without collecting meal applications. This report provides an update on the program's progress since implementation in the 2014–15 school year.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.235.290

UPDATE: Special Education Safety Net Survey 

Safety Net funding is available to local education agencies (LEAs) that demonstrate need for additional special education funding. Applicants must show need beyond state and federal funding already available to them. Each year, OSPI surveys LEAs for their satisfaction with the Safety Net process. This report includes the results of the survey.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.150.392

UPDATE: Educational Technology Assessments

Educators use educational technology assessments to determine if Washington's students meet standards for educational technology. In the 2018–19 school year, nearly 30% of school districts reported using an OSPI-developed assessment for educational technology. Over 90% of districts, though, reported providing instruction in educational technology to some or all of their students.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.655.075

UPDATE: School Transportation Efficiency

Each year, school districts receive an efficiency rating of their student transportation operations. Regional Transportation Coordinators (RTCs) conduct efficiency reviews based on districts meeting certain criteria. In 2019, 86 districts received an efficiency review. This report contains an update from the 2018-19 school year.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.160.117

UPDATE: Gangs in Schools Task Force

In 2007, the Legislature created a task force to examine current adult and youth gang activities that are affecting school safety and to make recommendations to the Legislature. The task force met until 2013, and they continue to reiterate their recommendations.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.300.490

Covering the Costs of Dual Credit for Students and Families

Each year, Washington's students and families pay out-of-pocket for the fees, books, and supplies that are required for participation in dual credit programs. This creates inequity by only allowing students who can afford the additional costs to have access to these courses. In 2019, the Legislature directed OSPI to study and make recommendations for how the state can make dual credit cost-free to students within existing funds. This report includes an examination of the current dual credit landscape, as well as recommendations for the Legislature, OSPI, higher education partners, and local school districts.

Authorizing bill/law: ESSB 6032, Part V (1)(S) [2018 Supplemental Operating Budget]

Competency-Based Assessments

The 2018 Legislature directed OSPI to review available and appropriate options for competency-based assessments that meet the state learning standards. This report includes recommendations for promoting more opportunities for competency-based learning and an example of a systemic approach currently being used that supports local implementation.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.655.070

UPDATE: Weapons in Schools

Each year, OSPI reports the number of incidents involving the possession of weapons on school premises, transportation systems, or in areas of facilities being used exclusively by public or private schools. This report contains the update from the 2017–18 school year.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.320.130

OSPI's Work in Sexual Health Education

OSPI supports Washington's school districts with the provision of sexual health education (SHE) that is consistent with the AIDS Omnibus Act and the Healthy Youth Act. In fiscal year 2019, OSPI's SHE staff achieved several accomplishments and deliverables, including reviewing SHE curricula, providing professional development to more than 600 educators, responding to over 200 requests for technical assistance, and more.

            Authorizing bill/law: ESSB 6032, Sec. 501 (56) [2018 Supplemental Operating Budget]

Social Emotional Learning in Washington's K–12 Schools

Social emotional learning (SEL) helps people build awareness and skills in managing emotions, setting goals, establishing relationships, and making responsible decisions. State-level work in SEL has led to the creation of resources for school leaders, teachers, parents and families, students, and communities; all of which are appendices to this report. This report contains information about Washington's state-level work in SEL, as well as recommendations for further work.

Appendix B: Glossary
 
Authorizing bill/law: SSB 5883 Sec. 513 (14) [2017–19 Operating Budget]
 

The TBIP serves students whose primary language is not English and who are eligible for English language development services. Eligible students receive TBIP services until they become proficient in English. Students are typically eligible for TBIP services for three to four years before transitioning out of the program. In the 2017–18 school year, about one out of every eight students receiving TBIP services were able to transition out of the program.

            Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.180.020

UPDATE: Online Learning

From the 2016–17 to the 2017–18 school year, the number of students accessing online learning in Washington state has grown by 34 percent. Some of this increase may be due to OSPI working more consciously with schools and school districts on accurate reporting of alternative learning, which is an ongoing effort. Overall, OSPI aims to use these data to continue guiding effective and accurate data reporting at the local level, as well as accountability and support for alternative learning programs at the state level. 

            Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.250.040

UPDATE: Homeless Students Data 
In the 2016–17 school year, there were nearly 40,000 students experiencing homelessness in Washington. Students experiencing homelessness suffer academically and are less likely to finish school when compared to their housed peers. The federal McKinney-Vento Act requires school districts to annually report the number of students experiencing homelessness enrolled in their schools. This report includes data on enrollment, participation, and performance.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.300.540

Transportation Contracting in Washington State 
In 2018, the Legislature required OSPI to coordinate with school districts and educational service districts that contract for transportation bus service and report information regarding those contract employees. This information includes the number of employees, the total cost of the contract, and retirement and health care benefits information.

Authorizing bill/law: ESSB 6032, Sec. 501(65) [2018 Supplemental Operating Budget]

School Day Task Force 
In 2018, the Legislature directed OSPI to convene a task force to define the duties and responsibilities that make up a ‘school day’ under the state’s program of basic education. The task force met three times over the summer and fall of 2018. The group reviewed research and data while exploring various organizational structures around issues of equity, time, and learning. This report contains three final recommendations to the Legislature by Superintendent Chris Reykdal. The recommendations include recognizing the actual time teachers spend carrying out their responsibilities, transforming Washington’s teacher time to more closely match effective international models, and authorizing a new study and workgroup on the topic of teacher time in Washington.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.150.220 and RCW 28A.150.260

UPDATE: Dual Credit Programs Enrollment

Dual credit courses provide high school students with the opportunity to earn both college and high school credit at the same time. Dual credit participation continues to grow, and the Legislature's investment in subsidizing exams for students experiencing poverty has likely aided in this growth. This annual update examines statewide enrollment patterns of students in dual credit programs.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.600.280, RCW 28A.320.196, and ESSB 6032, Sec. 501 (30) [2018 Supplemental Operating Budget]

2018

UPDATE: Career and Technical Education Equivalencies

CTE course equivalencies are classes that allow students the opportunity to meet standard in core subject areas through CTE. In the 2017–18 school year, slightly less statewide high school and skill center equivalencies were offered from the previous year. This may be a result of the addition of local equivalency courses being added as a data element, improving district reporting. The number of students served through statewide equivalencies in the 2017–18 school year was 30,422.

            Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.300.236

UPDATE: K–4 Reading Levels

In the 2017–18 school year, nearly 35 percent of students in the 96 percent of districts who reported data to OSPI were reading below grade level. Multiple partners at the state level work to measure and improve K–4 reading levels, and a major component of this is providing professional learning opportunities for educators. 

            Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.320.203

UPDATE: Building Bridges Workgroup (Dropout Prevention, Intervention, and Reengagement)

The Legislature established the Building Bridges Workgroup in 2007 to ensure a coordinated effort to keep all students on track to graduate from high school. With the Workgroup's recommendations as a foundation, the Graduation: A Team Effort (GATE) initiative continues to meet regularly. The four-year graduation rate in Washington continues to grow each year, but we have not yet met our statewide goal of 90 percent.

            Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.175.075

UPDATE: Assessment Inventory 
Each year since 2016, the Legislature has required OSPI to collect data and report on the amount of time students spend taking state- and district-level assessments. Over the years, there have been minimal changes in typical testing time. This report shows updated data for the 2017–18 school year.

Authorizing bill/law: ESSB 6032, Sec. 513 (23) [2018 Supplemental Operating Budget]

UPDATE: The State of Native Education 
The Office of Native Education (ONE), established in the 1960s, assists American Indian/Alaskan Native students to achieve basic education goals and meet state standards while supporting cultural identity. This annual report addresses the accomplishments and recommendations of ONE, a department within OSPI, over the past year.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.300.105

UPDATE: Learning Assistance Program Growth Data
The Learning Assistance Program (LAP) supports students below grade-level standards in English language arts and mathematics. During the 2017–18 school year, 15.5 percent of students received LAP services. The median growth students made across all LAP programs this year was 1.05 months of growth for each month enrolled. This report summarizes school district data and reports annual gains for specific LAP practices.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.165.100

UPDATE: Financial Education Public-Private Partnership 
The Financial Education Public-Private Partnership (FEPPP) was created by the Legislature and promotes personal financial education for students in Washington. To do this, FEPPP focuses on providing professional development and instructional materials for teachers. This report highlights the work of the FEPPP since the last report in December 2016.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.300.460

Collaborative Schools for Innovation and Success 
The Collaborative Schools for Innovation and Success (CSIS) pilot program was a partnership that paired colleges of education with low-performing, high-poverty elementary schools. The purpose of the five-year pilot was to increase student achievement, close the opportunity gap, and change the way teacher candidates learn to teach students in selected schools. This report describes the pilot project, outcomes, and recommendations for next steps.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.630.106

Civics Education – Demonstration Sites 
In 2018, the Legislature directed OSPI to strengthen civics education by expanding professional learning for teachers, ensuring students were provided stand-alone coursework in civics, and piloting innovative, comprehensive civics education programs in a demonstration site. OSPI selected Franklin Pierce School District to implement a pilot program and create a partnership with the Sunnyside School District. This report contains Franklin Pierce’s interim report from December 2018, as well as information on background and next steps.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.300.485

Promoting Pre-Apprenticeship Opportunities for High School Students 
In 2018, the Legislature required OSPI to solicit input from organizations with expertise in registered pre-apprenticeship programs, youth apprenticeship programs, and employer-based pre-apprenticeship and youth apprenticeship programs. This report includes recommendations from OSPI, based on the input from these organizations, on improving alignment between college-level vocational courses and high school curriculum, removing barriers preventing wider use of pre-apprenticeship and registered youth apprenticeship opportunities, and increasing awareness about the opportunities these programs offer.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.300.900

UPDATE: Combined FTE Experience of Students Participating in Running Start 
In 2011, the Legislature set a new limit on how much basic education funding would be available to cover the costs of Running Start, a program where students attend class on a college campus to earn high school and college credit at the same time. This report includes data and analysis of Running Start participation from 2010–18.

Authorizing bill/law: ESSB 6032, Sec. 502 (18) [2018 Supplemental Operating Budget]

Recommendations for Providing Career and Technical Education through Alternative Learning Experiences 
In 2018, the Legislature directed OSPI to make recommendations on how to provide and fund career and technical education (CTE) through alternative learning experience (ALE) courses. Utilizing feedback from stakeholders, OSPI determined some of the barriers and opportunities to ALE programs accessing CTE funding. In addition, OSPI is recommending a pilot program to inform the costs, rules, and systems needed to support statewide implementation.

Authorizing bill/law: ESSB 6032, Sec. 501 (66) [2018 Supplemental Operating Budget]

Academic, Mentoring, and Innovation Program 
The purpose of the AIM program is to support community-based youth development organizations that deliver educational services, mentoring, and linkages to positive, prosocial leisure and recreational activities. After a competitive grant process, OSPI approved the Washington State Boys & Girls Clubs Association for a two-year grant of up to $365,000. This report provides demographic and achievement information about the seven Boys & Girls Clubs sites who implemented community-specific models. Overall, the majority of student participants demonstrated improvement in reading and math, as well as a decrease in behavioral referrals at their schools.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.215.080

UPDATE: Truancy Report 
At the end of each school year, each school district compiles, verifies, and submits summary data on truancy petitions to OSPI. Recent changes in law require school districts and courts to stay petitions and refer students and families to a community truancy board, a new pathway intended to increase access to community supports. The number of petitions filed in the 2017–18 school year increased, which suggests a positive change.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.225.151

UPDATE: School Transportation Efficiency 
Since 2011, Washington state has been using a new student transportation evaluation system. The goal of the system is to encourage school districts to operate as efficiently as possible. Of the 295 school districts, 195 were rated as 100 percent efficient in 2018. Twenty-eight were rated as 90–100 percent efficient.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.160.117

UPDATE: Special Education Safety Net Survey 
Safety Net funding is available to local education agencies (LEAs) that demonstrate a need for special education funding in excess of state and federal funding. In order to improve the process, the Legislature requires OSPI to annually survey LEAs about their satisfaction with the Safety Net process. In September 2018, OSPI sent the survey to more than 1,000 administrators from all LEAs, and received 159 responses back.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.150.392

UPDATE: Gangs in Schools Task Force 
The Gangs in Schools Task Force was established under Revised Code of Washington (RCW) 28A.300.490 to examine current adult and youth gang activities that affect school safety. The task force met regularly from 2008–2013 and submitted recommendations to the Legislature for several years. The task force chose to focus on three primary areas of activity: data, policy guidance, and training. The task force stopped meeting in 2013 and reiterates the previous recommendations as submitted to the Legislature.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.300.490

UPDATE: Educational Technology Assessments 
School districts voluntarily administer educational technology assessments developed by OSPI across the elementary, middle, and high school grades. Educators use the assessments to determine if students meet Washington’s learning standards for educational technology. This report includes data provided by school districts on classroom-level use of educational technology assessments, as well as instructional opportunities in educational technology.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.655.075

Washington State Assessment System 
During the 2017 legislative session, OSPI issued a preliminary fiscal note in response to House Bill 2224, detailing the potential cost savings of eliminating Collection of Evidence activities, which served as an alternative assessment option for students to meet graduation requirements. The Legislature then adopted those estimated savings in the 2017–19 Biennial Operating Budget. This report details the actions OSPI took to achieve the estimated cost savings, including the elimination of two staff positions and the termination of all contract activity relative to Collection of Evidence.

Authorizing bill/law: ESSB 6032, Sec. 513(1) [2018 Supplemental Operating Budget]

Schools Implementing the Community Eligibility Provision 
In 2018, the Legislature passed House Bill 2610, which directs OSPI to develop and implement a plan to increase the number of schools participating in the United States Department of Agriculture’s Community Eligibility Program (CEP). The program is a meal service option for schools to serve meals at no cost to all enrolled students on a school campus. This annual report includes the number of schools participating in CEP, barriers to participation, and recommendations to increase participation.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.235.290

Special Education Safety Net Study 
Safety Net funding is available to local education agencies that demonstrate a need for special education funding in excess of available state and federal funding. In 2017, the Legislature directed OSPI to gather a workgroup to review the current Safety Net process, make recommendations of possible adjustments to improve the process, and evaluate the appropriate funding level to meet the purpose of Safety Net. This report provides a summary of recommendations approved by Superintendent Reykdal.

Authorizing bill/law: House Bill 2242, Sec. 408 (2017)

Foster Care Outcomes 
In 2016, the Legislature laid the foundation for a holistic, coordinated approach to educational success for children and youth in foster care. This report describes the cross-system collaboration of the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction; the Department of Children, Youth, and Families; and the Washington Student Achievement Council to promote stability and improve educational outcomes for children and youth in foster care.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 74.13.1051

Secondary Transition Planning Implementation Plan 
When planning for transition from school to post-school life, students with disabilities, families, school staff, and government agencies must navigate between multiple complex systems. This report summarizes collaborative activities between the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, the Department of Social and Health Services’ (DSHS) Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, and the DSHS Developmental Disabilities Administration to break down barriers preventing a smooth, efficient transition process.

Authorizing bill/law: ESSB 6032, Sec. 501 (57) [2018 Supplemental Operating Budget]

Recommendations to Amend Provisos 
In 2017, a total of 114 education provisos were in effect. OSPI proposes amending many of them by combining, revising, and moving. The revisions will simplify the budget-writing process by reducing the number of program budgets and by creating separate program budgets for the State Board of Education (SBE), the Professional Educator Standards Board (PESB), and the Financial Education Public-Private Partnership (FEPPP).

Authorizing bill/law: ESSB 6032, Sec. 201 (64) [2018 Supplemental Operating Budget]

UPDATE: Transitional Bilingual Instruction Program (TBIP) 
During the 2016–17 school year, about 135,000 students – who collectively speak 225 languages – were classified as English language learners. The number represents a 3.7 percent increase from 2015–16. Nearly all of those students were enrolled in the Transitional Bilingual Instruction Program. This report provides data on the student achievement of those students.

2016–17 Appendices

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.180.020

UPDATE: School Food Service Programs 
In fiscal year 2017, the state Legislature provided $7.1 million for students who qualify for free and reduced-price meals. State funding is required for federal “match” money, which totals $300 million annually. This report summarizes funding to the four major ways the state helps feed low-income students: eliminating co-pays, the summer food service program, Meals for Kids grants, and breakfast assistance.

Authorizing bill/law: SSB 5883, Sec. 506 (4) [2017–19 Operating Budget]

Special Education Safety Net Workgroup: Interim Report 
Safety Net funding is given to districts that demonstrate a need for additional funding beyond what the state and federal government provides. This interim report makes recommendations on possible adjustments to the Safety Net process and on funding levels.

Authorizing bill/law: HB 2242, Sec. 408 [2017]

School Accountability Funding
Ensuring that schools educate all students – making them accountable – is paramount to the success of public education. If that doesn’t happen, support needs to be provided to schools. In 2017, state legislation passed requiring the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) to create and submit a plan for additional school accountability supports. Approval of the plan will add $5 million to school accountability funding in fiscal year 2019.

Authorizing bill/law: SSB 5883 Sec. 513 (14) [2017–19 Operating Budget]

UPDATE: Dyslexia Report 
It is projected that 10 percent of the United States population have dyslexia; in Washington, that translates to 100,000 Washington students. Those who receive appropriate identification and interventions can make strides in their educational development as they prepare for college, career, and life. During the 2016–17 school year about 100 individuals participated in training offered by the educational service districts.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.300.530

Educational Data on Military Families 
While the funding for the identification and support of students with dyslexia ended in 2010, the Dyslexia Handbook and the variety of professional learning resources are still widely available. During the 2014-15 school year, members from the nine regional educational service districts did not receive any requests for professional development workshops on dyslexia, although many ESDs did provide technical assistance.

Appendices

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.300.505

UPDATE: Online Learning 
In the 2016–17 school year, more than 33,000 Washington students enrolled in about 81,000 K–12 online courses. The number of students increased by 4.7 percent from 2015–16; the number of courses by 4.2 percent.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.250.040 § (3)

Dual Credit Demographic Data Among Academic Acceleration Grantees 
A number of programs in Washington State provide high school students the opportunity to earn high school and college credit at the same time. By earning “dual credit,” students ease their transition into college by getting a head start on their postsecondary coursework. In 2017, more than 195,000 students – about one out of every two students (56.7 percent) – completed at least one dual credit course. That number is an increase of 36.8 percent from 2010.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.600.280 and RCW 28A.320.196 

UPDATE: Combined FTE Experience of Students Participating in the Running Start Program 
The Running Start program allows high school juniors and seniors to attend institutions of higher education using state K−12 basic education dollars. For many years, those students were funded by the state as a 2.0 full-time equivalent. Beginning in 2011–12, funding was reduced to a maximum of 1.2 FTE per student. This report examines the effect the reduction has had on student course enrollment patterns in the high school and Running Start. The results are based on the three years of data available since the change.

Authorizing bill/law: ESSB 5883, Sec. 502 (18) [2017–19 Operating Budget]

School District Supplemental Contracts

House Bill 2242 (2017) requires school districts to annually report to OSPI on supplemental contracts entered into for additional time, responsibility, or incentive. Supplemental pay is the difference between the annualized base salary and the annualized total final salary for a 1.0 full-time equivalent employee. Total supplemental pay for the 2017–18 school year is estimated at $1.179 billion.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.400.2001

2017

UPDATE: Collaborative Schools for Innovation and Success Pilot 
The Collaborative Schools for Innovation and Success pilot program pairs colleges of education with low-performing, high-poverty elementary schools to both increase student achievement and change the way teacher candidates learn to teach students in these schools. This is the third full year of the pilot.

Appendix A: Western Washington University/Washington Elementary School 2017 Progress Report
Appendix B: University of Washington/Roxhill Elementary 2017 Progress Report
Appendix C: Gonzaga and Whitworth University/Holmes Elementary School 2017 Progress Report

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.630.106 § (2)

UPDATE: School Health Profiles 
Every two years, OSPI asks Washington public schools to report the curricula they use for sexual health education. The purpose of the survey is to gauge how well the curricula taught in Washington align with the Healthy Youth Act.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.300.475 § (7)

K–4 Reading Levels 
In 2016–17, nearly 400,000 K–4 students were enrolled in Washington schools. Among the reporting districts, about one out of every three of those students (33.6 percent) were reading below grade level. This report summarizes the intervention that those students received.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.320.203 § (3)

Improving Educational Outcomes for Students in Foster Care 
Nearly 10,000 school-age children were in foster care at the beginning of the 2016–17 school year. School stability should be a central consideration anytime a placement change is being made. This report describes the cross-system collaboration of OSPI, the Department of Social Health Services’ Children’s Administration (DSHS-CA), and the Administrative Office of the Courts (AOC) to promote educational stability and improve educational outcomes for foster children.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 74.13.1051 § (3)

Assessment Inventory 
In 2016, the state Legislature asked OSPI to find out how much time Washington students spent taking state and district-required tests. OSPI collected data from 88 percent of districts via an online survey. The median testing time in 2016–17 for state tests ranged from seven hours and 20 minutes in 3rd grade to nine hours and 50 minutes in 8th grade.

Authorizing bill/law: 2ESHB 2376, Sec. 511 (28) [2016 Supplemental Operating Budget]

Learning Assistance Program Growth Data 
The Learning Assistance Program (LAP) is a supplemental services program that assists underachieving students in reading, writing, and mathematics, as well as the readiness skills needed to successfully learn these core content areas. In 2016–17, about one in eight students (13.6 percent) received LAP services. This report looks at how much academic growth is gained by students participating in LAP and what practices, activities, and programs are associated with the most academic growth.

Appendices (Click on the “Data” icon and select the 2016–17 data from “Previous Years’ LAP Data)

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.165.100 § (3)

Post-School Outcomes for Students with Disabilities 
The education data center monitors the outcomes for individualized education plan–eligible special education students after high school graduation. For 2014–15, seven out of every 10 students who had received special education services were enrolled in higher education or in some other post-secondary education or training program, or competitively employed or in some other employment, within one year of leaving high school.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.155.220 § (3)

STEM Pilot Program 
Science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education focuses on helping students become the next generation of professionals who will create the new ideas, new products and new industries of the future. But teaching STEM requires the proper physical space – for many districts, more space than they have.

In 2015 the state Legislature established the STEM Pilot Program and allocated $12.5 million for it. In establishing the STEM Pilot Program, the Legislature also required OSPI to make recommendations on how the program can be integrated into the existing School Construction Assistance Program. Since the establishment of the STEM Pilot Program, grants have been awarded to six school districts. This report summarizes the work done at those districts.

Authorizing bill/law: 2EHB 1115, Sec. 5026  [2015] and ESHB 2380, Sec. 5005 (8) [2016]

Open Educational Resources Project 
Open Educational Resources (OER) are teaching and learning materials that reside in the public domain or that have been released under an open license. OSPI created a collection of openly licensed courseware, aligned with the Common Core State Standards, to provide districts with a broader selection of materials that are more up-to-date. This report outlines how the project built OER awareness in the districts, and the goals for the next two years.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.300.803 § (2) (d)

Career and Technical Education Equivalency 
“Course equivalencies” are classes meet both CTE requirements as well as math, science or English language arts requirements. In 2016–17, about 1,800 such courses (in high schools and skill centers) were offered to about 31,000 students statewide.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.300.236 § (3)

Washington State Seal of Biliteracy 
In 2014, Washington became the second state in the U.S. to authorize the Seal of Biliteracy, which is given to students who are proficient in two languages, regardless of whether English is their first language or not. To date, more than 4,000 students have received a seal.

Authorizing bill/law: SB 6424 (2014) §2

UPDATE: Truancy Report 
At the end of each school year, districts compile, verify, and submit summary data on truancy petitions to OSPI. In 2016–17, 3,084 truancy petitions were reported, a decrease of 21.9 percent from 2015–16.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.225.15

UPDATE: K-3 Class Size Reduction Construction Grant Program 
With requirements to increase full-day kindergarten and decrease the number of students in K–3 classrooms, districts are challenged to find necessary space for students. To address the challenge, the Legislature in 2015 established new K–3 Class Size Reduction Construction grants and provided $235 million. To date, 21 districts have been awarded funding for the creation of 488 classrooms.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.525.058 § (3)

Model Salary Grid 
Legislation passed in 2017 changes how funding is allocated for teachers and other certificated employees. Previously, the allocation was based on a salary allocation model that took years of teaching and education into account. The new system provides funding based on a state average funding level.

The salary allocation model had been in use for decades. Because the change in funding is so sweeping, the Legislature required OSPI to create a workgroup to recommend a model salary grid that districts can, but are not required to, use in setting local salaries. This report represents the workgroup’s deliberations.

Authorizing bill/law: EHB 2242 § 107

UPDATE: Educational Technology Assessments 
Educational technology assessments are voluntarily administered in the elementary, middle and high school grades. Teachers use the assessments to determine if students meet Washington’s standards for educational technology. In 2015–16, 41 percent of school districts reported using an OSPI-developed assessment for educational technology.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.655.075 § (2)(b)

Washington's Comprehensive Assessment Program 
The Washington Comprehensive Assessment Program (WCAP) includes all state tests administered in Washington: Smarter Balanced Assessments (ELA and math for student in grades 3-8 and high school), Measurements of Student Progress (science, grades 5 and 8), end-of-course exams in math and biology and specialized testing for English proficiency, alternate achievement standards, and graduation alternatives. The report summarizes participation in the tests, as well as the costs associated with each.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.300.041(8) and RCW 28A.655.066

UPDATE: Safety Net Survey 
In 2016–17, 107 local education agencies applied for a total of $49.6 million in Safety Net funding. The Legislature requires OSPI to annually survey school districts about improving the special education Safety Net process. This report summarizes the annual survey.

Appendix A

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.150.392 § (3)

Gang Activities in Schools 
Since 2007, a task force has examined how gangs affect school safety and outlines methods for preventing new gangs, eliminating existing gangs, gathering intelligence and sharing information about gang activities. Because of a variety of factors, the task force hasn’t met since 2013. Its recommendations are carried forward from then.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.300.490 § (3)

UPDATE: Dropout Prevention, Intervention, and Reengagement 
Although graduation rates continue to climb, gaps between groups of students remain. The Building Bridges program, established in 2007, provides academic and non-academic supports to those students most in need so that they stay in school or reconnect with school. Through Building Bridges, a multi-agency workgroup – Graduation: A Team Effort (GATE) initiative – has emerged. This report focuses on GATE’s work in 2017.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.175.075 § (3) (a)

The State of Native Education 
This report addresses the accomplishments and recommendations of the Office of Native Education, including the refined Since Time Immemorial Tribal Sovereignty Curriculum, expanded professional development, and State-Tribal Education Compacts.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.300.105

School Transportation Efficiency 
An efficiency evaluation system of school district transportation operations was adopted as part of the new student transportation funding system implemented in 2011. The rating process was intended to encourage school districts to operate in as efficient manner as possible. In 2017, 221 of the state’s 295 districts achieved an efficiency rating of greater than 90 percent.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.160.117 § (2)

Educational Interpreters – Performance Standards 
Educational interpreters communicate with students who are deaf or having hearing difficulties. Since 2014, standards for the interpreters have existed, as well as assessments that measure the interpreters’ mastery of American Sign Language. In 2017, the Legislature asked OSPI to estimate the costs reviewing the assessments. The estimate was about $37,000.

Authorizing bill/law: SSB 5142 Sec. 2 [2017]

Education Provisos 2017 
OSPI is required annually to report on the status of all education budget provisos. In 2017, there were 79 such provisos.

Authorizing bill/law: SSB 5883, Sec. 501(1)(c) [2017-19 Operating Budget]

UPDATE: Teacher and Principal Evaluation Program Update 
In 2010 the Legislature created new evaluation criteria for both teachers and principals. The scores from the evaluations fall into one of four categories: Level 1 is “unsatisfactory,” Level 2 is “basic,” Level 3 is “proficient” and Level 4 is “distinguished.” In 2015–16, 96 percent of teachers were given scores of proficient or distinguished.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.405

Washington Integrated Student Supports Workgroup Final Report 
The reasons some students struggle are varied and complex. Overcoming them involves a community-wide approach. At the behest of the state Legislature, in 2016 OSPI’s Center for the Improvement of Student Learning developed the Washington Integrated Student Supports Protocol to help schools create a student-specific framework of supports. The Legislature also established the Integrated Student Supports (ISS) Workgroup, which would make recommendations on implementing the protocol in school districts. This report describes the workgroup’s recommendations.

Authorizing bill/law: 4SHB 1541 Sec. 802 (5) [2016] 

Graduation and Dropout Statistics Annual Report 
Graduation and dropout rates are important indicators of the status of K-12 education in Washington. The 4-year graduation rate is 79.1 percent for students who entered 9th grade for the first time in 2012–13.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.175.100

UPDATE: Financial Education Public-Private Partnership 
The Financial Education Public-Private Partnership promotes personal financial education. This report highlights the work of the FEPPP, including the adoption in September 2016 of state financial education learning standards.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.300.460

UPDATE: Transitional Bilingual Instruction Program (TBIP) 
During the 2015–16 school year, about 130,000 students – who collectively speak 220 languages – were classified as English language learners. Nearly all were enrolled in the Transitional Bilingual Instruction Program. This report provides data on the student achievement of those students.

2014-15 Appendices

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.180.020

UPDATE: Online Learning
In the 2015–16 school year, nearly 32,000 Washington students enrolled in about 78,000 K–12 online courses. The number of students increased by 2.3 percent from 2014–15; the number of courses by 3.4 percent.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.250.040

Homeless Students Data 
The federal McKinney-Vento Act requires all school districts to report annually the number of homeless students enrolled in schools. In Washington, that number has increased every year since McKinney-Vento was reauthorized in 2001. During the 2015–16 school year, 39,671 students were identified as homeless, which amounted to 3.7 percent of students statewide.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.300.540

UPDATE: Innovation in Supplemental Contracts 
Districts are required to separate and report salary expenses related to implementing specific activities, such as closing opportunity gaps; focusing on science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) classes; or providing arts education. Each year, OSPI reports on those expenses. In 2015-16, the total was $62,641, all reported by the Mount Adams School District.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.400.200, §4

Academic, Innovation, and Mentoring Grant Program 
The 2015–17 state operating budget appropriated $125,000 to fund the Academic, Innovation, and Mentoring (AIM) grant program. AIM funds youth development programs that deliver educational services and mentoring activities for youth ages 6 to 18 during times when school is not in session. In 2015, The Washington State Boys & Girls Clubs Association was approved for the AIM grant in five locations: East Bellevue, Mt. Vernon, Spokane, Tacoma, and Vancouver.

Authorizing bill/law: ESSB 6052, Section 501 (40) [2015–17 Operating Budget]

2016

Assessment Inventory 
In 2016, the state Legislature asked OSPI to find out how much time Washington students spent taking state and district-required tests. OSPI collected data from 78 percent of districts via an online survey. The median testing time in 2015–16 for state tests ranged from seven hours and twenty minutes in 3rd grade to nine hours and thirty minutes in 8th grade.

Authorizing bill/law: 2ESHB 2376, Sec 511 (28) [2016 Supplemental Operating Budget]

Recommendations of the WaKIDS Workgroup
The Washington Kindergarten Inventory of Developing Skills (WaKIDS) is a transition process that helps to ensure a successful start to the K‒12 experience and connect the key adults in a child's life. WaKIDS is required in all state-funded full-day kindergarten classrooms. As the number of those classrooms increase across the state, the WaKIDS workgroup recommends how to implement the program statewide.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.655.080, § (2)(d)

Washington's Comprehensive Assessment Program 
The Washington Comprehensive Assessment Program (WCAP) includes all state tests administered in Washington. Statewide testing is important because it helps ensure all public school students, no matter where they go to school, receive a quality education. Due to the new state standards in English language arts and mathematics, the most significant change to the WCAP was new assessments, which began in 2014‒15.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.300.041 (8) and RCW 28A.655.066

UPDATE: Dropout Prevention, Intervention and Reengagement 
This report highlights the annual progress of the Building Bridges program – established by the Legislature to prevent students from dropping out of school and to reconnect students who are already disengaged – and the statewide Graduation: A Team Effort (GATE) initiative.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.175.075 § (3)(a)

UPDATE: Truancy Report 
At the end of each school year, districts compile, verify and submit summary data on truancy petitions to OSPI. In 2015–16, 3,950 truancy petitions were reported, an increase of 4.8 percent from 2014–15.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.225.151

Skilled Workforce Pilot Program 
Local employers want local workers. But the jobs of tomorrow require specific skills. To help develop students into skilled workers, the Legislature allocated money for a summer internship pilot project. OSPI selected two schools from Seattle Public Schools (Rainier Beach High School and Cleveland High School). The schools partnered with the Port of Seattle and manufacturing and maritime employers to provide internships to 10 students each for 5½-week internships. This report summarizes the first year of the pilot program.

Authorizing bill/law: 2ESHB 2376, Sec. 501 (47) [2016 Supplemental Operating Budget]

The State of Native Education 
This report addresses the accomplishments and recommendations of the Office of Native Education, including the refined Since Time Immemorial Tribal Sovereignty Curriculum, expanded professional development, and State-Tribal Education Compacts.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.300.105

K-4 Reading Levels 
In the 2015–16 school year, nearly 420,000 K–4 students were enrolled in Washington schools. Among the reporting districts, more than one-third of these students were reading below grade level. This report summarizes the intervention that those students received.

Appendices

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.320.203

STEM Pilot Program 
Science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education focuses on helping students become the next generation of professionals who will create the new ideas, new products and new industries of the future. But teaching STEM requires the proper physical space – for many districts, more space than they have. In 2015, the state Legislature established the STEM Pilot Program and allocated $12.5 million for it. In establishing the STEM Pilot Program, the Legislature also required OSPI to make recommendations on how the program can be integrated into the existing School Construction Assistance Program.

Authorizing bills/laws: 2EHB 1115, Sec. 5026 [2015] and ESHB 2380, Sec. 5005 (8) [2016]

Digital Citizenship 
Teaching students to navigate the deep waters of technology and become responsible, ethical digital citizens is crucial to their development and to our future. This report makes recommendations on how digital citizenship and media literacy can be improved.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.650.045 § (2)(a)

School Transportation Efficiency 
An efficiency evaluation system of school district transportation operations was adopted as part of the new student transportation funding system implemented in 2011. The rating process was intended to encourage school districts to operate in as efficient manner as possible. In 2016, 182 of the state’s 295 districts achieved a 100 percent efficiency rating.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.160.117 § (2)

UPDATE: Educational Technology Assessments 
Educational technology assessments are voluntarily administered in the elementary, middle and high school grades. Teachers use the assessments to determine if students meet Washington’s standards for educational technology. In 2015–16, 42 percent of school districts reported using an OSPI-developed assessment for educational technology.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.655.075 § (2)(b)

UPDATE: Collaborative Schools for Innovation and Success Pilot Project 
The Collaborative Schools for Innovation and Success pilot program pairs colleges of education with low-performing, high-poverty elementary schools to both increase student achievement and change the way teacher candidates learn to teach students in these schools. This is the second full year of the pilot.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.630.106 § (2)

UPDATE: State of the State for Teacher and Principal Evaluation 
In 2010, the Legislature created new evaluation criteria for both teachers and principals. In 2015–16, all teachers and principals began using the system. For that year, about 96 percent of teachers and 95 percent of principals were rated “proficient” or “distinguished.”

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.405.100 § (7)(e)(v)

Post-School Outcomes for Students with Disabilities
The Education Data Center monitors the outcomes for individualized education plan–eligible special education students after high school graduation. For 2013–14, two out of every three students who had received special education services were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program, or competitively employed or in some other employment, within one year of leaving high school.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.155.220 § (3)

UPDATE: Gang Activities in Schools 
Since 2007, a task force has examined how gangs affect school safety and outlines methods for preventing new gangs, eliminating existing gangs, gathering intelligence and sharing information about gang activities. Because of a variety of factors, the task force hasn’t met since 2013. Its recommendations are carried forward from then.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.300.490, § (3)

Mandatory School Attendance and Truancy Amelioration in Online Schools 
While attendance and truancy are not difficult to determine in a traditional classroom setting, they present a challenge with Alternative Learning Experience (ALE) programs. In 2015, the Legislature tasked OSPI with developing recommendations on defining the terms for online schools, which are one type of ALE program. To honor the Legislature’s intent, OSPI has made recommendations that also address the two other types of ALE programs: site-based courses and remote courses.

Authorizing bill/law: Second Substitute House Bill 2449 § (16)

K-3 Class Size Calculations
As part of the state’s interest in the class sizes of early grades, the Legislature required school districts to report K-3 class size by grade, by month. For 2015–16, the statewide average class across K–3 was 21.18 for high poverty schools (in which more than 50 percent of the students receive free or reduced-price lunch) and 21.70 with non-high poverty schools.
Appendix A: Class size calculations

Authorizing bill/law: ESSB 6052, Sec. 502 (1)(g) [2015–17 operating budget]

UPDATE: Safety Net Survey 
The Legislature requires OSPI to annually survey school districts about improving the special education Safety Net process. An electronic survey was distributed to districts that participated in the Safety Net program during 2015–16. This report summarizes the survey results.

Appendix A 

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.150.392 § (3)

Learning Assistance Program Growth Data 
The Learning Assistance Program (LAP) is a supplemental services program that assists underachieving students in reading, writing, and mathematics, as well as the readiness skills needed to successfully learn these core content areas. This program looks at how much academic growth is gained by students participating in LAP and what practices, activities, and programs are associated with the most academic growth.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.165.100 § (3)

Washington Integrated Student Supports Protocol – Implementation Workgroup 
One solution to the dropout problem is “wraparound services.” Supporting the needs of at-risk students cannot be done only in a classroom; it takes a community. That includes social workers, mental health counselors, doctors and others, including parents. This report outlines initial recommendations of the workgroup tasked with implementing the Washington Integrated Student Supports Protocol.

Authorizing bill/law: 4SHB 1541 (2016), Section 802 (5)

UPDATE: School Food Service Programs 
In fiscal year 2016, the state Legislature provided $7.11 million for students who qualify for free and reduced-price meals. State funding is required for federal “match” money, which totals $300 million annually. This report summarizes funding to the four major child nutrition programs.

Authorizing bill/law: ESSB 6052, Section 506 (4) [2015–17 Operating Budget]

Education Provisos 2016 
OSPI is required annually to report on the status of all education budget provisos. In 2016, there were 77 such provisos.

Authorizing bill/law: 2ESHB 2376, Sec. 501 (1)(c) [2016 Supplemental Operating Budget] 

K-3 Class Size Reduction Construction Grant Program 
With requirements to increase full-day kindergarten and decrease the number of students in K-3 classrooms, districts are challenged to find necessary space for students. To address the challenge, the Legislature in 2015 established new K–3 Class Size Reduction Construction grants and provided $200 million. This report summarizes the work done to date on the pilot program.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.525.058 § 3

High-Performance School Buildings 
This biennial report updates school district construction projects built to high-performance standards. A high-performance building is one that is energy and resource efficient, reduces its impact on the environment and provides a healthy and comfortable indoor environment. This is the final report required by state law.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 39.35D.040 § 3

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) Pilot Program 
Established in the 2015–17 Capital Budget, the Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM) Pilot Program provides grants to districts to construct or modernize science and science lab classrooms. This legislative report outlines activities around the program to date.

Authorizing bill/law: ESSB 2380, Sec. 6018 (3)(d) [2016 Supplemental Capital Budget] 

Graduation and Dropout Statistics Annual Report 
Graduation and dropout rates are important indicators of the status of K–12 education in Washington state. OSPI prepares an annual graduation and dropout report that includes information for all students as well as the sub-categories of students represented within the Washington State Report Card. For students in the Class of 2015, Washington’s four-year graduation rate is 78.1 percent. The five-year graduation rate is 81.1 percent.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.175.010

UPDATE: The Allocation Basis for Student Transportation
The Revised Code of Washington (RCW) 28A.160.180 (4) requires the Superintendent of Public Instruction to submit annually “a report outlining the methodology and rationale used in determining the statistical coefficients for each site characteristic used to determine the (transportation) allocation for the following year.”

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.160.180 § 4

UPDATE: Transitional Bilingual Instruction Program (TBIP) (PDF)
During the 2014–15 school year, about 120,000 students – who collectively speak more than 200 languages – were classified as English language learners. Nearly all were enrolled in the Transitional Bilingual Instruction Program. This report provides data on the student achievement of those students.

2014–15 Appendices

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.180.020

K–4 Reading Levels
In the 2014–15 school year, more than 400,000 K–4 students were enrolled in Washington schools. Among the reporting districts, at least one-quarter of these students were reading below grade level. This report summarizes the intervention that those students received.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.320.203

Online Learning Annual Report
In the 2014–15 school year, nearly 31,000 Washington students enrolled in about 73,000 K-12 online courses. The number of students greatly increased while the number of enrollments slightly increased from the previous year, indicating more students are taking a smaller number of courses.

Authorizing bill/law: RCW 28A.250.040 

2015

UPDATE: Dyslexia Report
While the funding for the identification and support of students with dyslexia ended in 2010, the Dyslexia Handbook and the variety of professional learning resources are still widely available. During the 2014–15 school year, members from the nine regional educational service districts did not receive any requests for professional development workshops on dyslexia, although many ESDs did provide technical assistance.

Education Provisos 2015
OSPI is required annually to report on the status of all education budget provisos. In 2015, there were a total of 66.

  • Authorizing bill/law: 3SSB 5034, Sec. 501 (1)(iii) [2013–15 Operating Budget]

The State of Native Education
This report addresses the accomplishments and recommendations of the Office of Native Education, including the refined Since Time Immemorial Tribal Sovereignty Curriculum, expanded professional development, and State-Tribal Education Compacts.

UPDATE: School Health Profiles
Every two years, OSPI asks Washington public schools to report the curricula they use for sexual health education. The purpose of the survey is to gauge how well the curricula taught in Washington align with the Healthy Youth Act.

Academic, Innovation, and Mentoring Grant Program
The 2015-17 state operating budget appropriated $125,000 to fund the Academic, Innovation, and Mentoring (AIM) grant program. AIM funds community-based youth development pilot programs that deliver educational services, mentoring, and linkages to positive out-of-school time activities for youth ages 6 to 18. The following details the work done on this program.

  • Authorizing bill/law: ESSB 6052, Sec. 501 (40) [2015–17 Operating Budget]

Learning Assistance Program Growth Data
The Learning Assistance Program (LAP) is a supplemental services program that assists underachieving students in reading, writing, and mathematics, as well as the readiness skills needed to successfully learn these core content areas. This program looks at how much academic growth is gained by students participating in LAP and what practices, activities, and programs are associated with the most academic growth.

UPDATE: Combined FTE Experience of Students Participating in the Running Start Program (PDF)
The Running Start program allows high school juniors and seniors to attend institutions of higher education using state K−12 basic education dollars. For many years, those students were funded by the state as a 2.0 full-time equivalent. Beginning in 2011–12, funding was reduced to a maximum of 1.2 FTE per student. This report examines the effect the reduction has had on student course enrollment patterns in the high school and Running Start. The results are based on the three years of data available since the change.

  • Authorizing bill/law: ESSB 6052, Sec. 502 (18) [2015–17 Operating Budget]

UPDATE: School Food Service Programs
The state Legislature annually provides more than $7 million for students who qualify for free and reduced-price meals. State funding is required for federal “match” money, which totals $300 million annually. This report summarizes funding to the four major child nutrition programs.

  • Authorizing bill/law: 3ESSB 6052, Sec. 506 [2015–17 Operating Budget]

K-3 Class Size Reduction Construction
With requirements to increase full-day kindergarten and decrease the number of students in K–3 classrooms, districts are challenged to find necessary space for students. To address the challenge, the Legislature in 2015 established new K–3 Class Size Reduction grants. This report summarizes the work done to date on the pilot program.

UPDATE: Truancy Report
At the end of each school year, districts compile, verify and submit summary data on truancy petitions to the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI). For 2014-15, there was an increase in the total number of truancy petitions reported being filed.

Washington's Comprehensive Assessment Program
The Washington Comprehensive Assessment Program (WCAP) includes all state tests administered in Washington. Statewide testing is important because it helps ensure all public school students, no matter where they go to school, receive a quality education. Due to the new state standards in English language arts and mathematics, the most significant upcoming change to the WCAP will be the new assessments in 2014‒15.

UPDATE: Dropout Prevention, Intervention and Reengagement
This report highlights the annual progress of the Building Bridges program – established by the Legislature to prevent students from dropping out of school and to reconnect students who are already disengaged – and the statewide Graduation: A Team Effort (GATE) initiative.

Collaborative Schools for Innovation and Success Pilot Project
The Collaborative Schools for Innovation and Success pilot program pairs colleges of education with low-performing, high-poverty elementary schools to both increase student achievement and change the way teacher candidates learn to teach students in these schools.

Recommendations of the WaKIDS Workgroup
The Washington Kindergarten Inventory of Developing Skills (WaKIDS) is a transition process that helps to ensure a successful start to the K‒12 experience and connect the key adults in a child's life. WaKIDS is required in all state-funded full-day kindergarten classrooms. As the number of state-funded full-day kindergarten classrooms increases across the state, the WaKIDS workgroup recommends how to implement the program statewide.

School Transportation Efficiency
An efficiency evaluation system of school district transportation operations was adopted as part of the new student transportation funding system implemented in 2011. The rating process was intended to encourage school districts to operate in as efficient manner as possible.

UPDATE: Gang Activities in Schools
Since 2007, a task force has examined how gangs affect school safety and outlines methods for preventing new gangs, eliminating existing gangs, gathering intelligence and sharing information about gang activities. No money was given to the task force in 2015, so its recommendations are being carried forward from 2012.

Open Educational Resources Project
Open Educational Resources (OER) are teaching and learning materials that reside in the public domain or that have been released under an open license. OSPI created a collection of openly licensed courseware, aligned with the Common Core State Standards, to provide districts with a broader selection of materials that are more up-to-date. This report outlines how the project built OER awareness in the districts, and the goals for the next two years.

UPDATE: Safety Net Survey
The Legislature requires OSPI to annually survey school districts about improving the special education Safety Net process. An electronic survey was distributed to districts that participated in the Safety Net program during 2014–15. This report summarizes the survey results.

UPDATE: Educational Technology Assessments
Educational technology assessments are voluntarily administered in the elementary, middle and high school grades. Teachers use the assessments to determine if students meet Washington’s standards for educational technology. In the 2014–15 school year, school districts provided data on classroom-level use of educational technology assessments.

Post-School Outcomes for Students with Disabilities
The education data center monitors the outcomes for individualized education plan–eligible special education students after high school graduation. This report summarizes the data currently available to OSPI.

Dual Credit Demographic Data Among Academic Acceleration Grantees
A number of programs in Washington State provide high school students the opportunity to earn high school and college credit at the same time. By earning “dual credit,” students ease their transition into college by getting a head start on their postsecondary coursework. And succeeding in these rigorous programs shows students they can succeed in college.

UPDATE: State of the State for Teacher and Principal Evaluation
In 2010, the Legislature created new evaluation criteria for both teachers and principals. By 2013–14 school year most teachers were using the revised system and were rated proficient or distinguished. Half of teachers reported that they felt that TPEP would improve student learning. Most principals felt that TPEP had improved their understanding of good teaching and helped them identify teachers who need more support. All teachers and principals will use the revised system beginning in the 2015–16 school year.

UPDATE: Dual Credit Programs Enrollment: Statewide and Among Academic Acceleration Grantees
There are a number of programs in Washington State that provide high school students the opportunity to earn high school and college credit at the same time. By earning “dual credit,” students ease their transition into college by getting a head start on their post-secondary coursework. And succeeding in these rigorous programs shows students they can succeed in college. OSPI’s most recent data show that Washington’s 536 high schools offered a combined 1,252 dual credit program offerings to 173,917 students. In 2013, the Legislature passed House Bill 1642 to promote dual credit programs and eliminate barriers that prevent students from enrolling.

Educational System Capacity to Accommodate Increased Resources
Recent laws, and a Supreme Court decision, could mean additional resources for districts. Are districts able to handle the increased resources? In May 2014, a survey was sent to the state’s 295 public school districts asking them that and related questions. This report outlines the collected responses.

The Allocation Basis for Student Transportation
RCW 28A.160.180 (4) requires the Superintendent of Public Instruction to submit annually “a report outlining the methodology and rationale used in determining the statistical coefficients for each site characteristic used to determine the (transportation) allocation for the following year.”

Graduation and Dropout Statistics Annual Report
Graduation and dropout rates are important indicators of the status of K–12 education in Washington state. OSPI prepares an annual graduation and dropout report that includes information for all students as well as the sub-categories of students represented within the Washington State Report Card. For 2014, Washington’s four-year graduation rate is 77.2 percent. The five-year graduation rate is 79.9 percent.

UPDATE: Educator Training to Enhance Skills of Students with Dyslexia
While the funding for the identification and support of students with dyslexia ended in 2010, the Dyslexia Handbook and the variety of professional learning resources are still widely available. A workgroup will convene in 2015 to revise the Handbook. In addition, ESDs are currently integrating key content and strategies on dyslexia into existing professional learning and technical assistance support they provide school districts.

Innovative Schools and Zones
In 2011, the Legislature established an application process to create new Innovation Schools and Zones (groups of schools). The focus of the schools and zones was to be on the arts, science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (A-STEM or STEAM), but non-A-STEM schools and zones also could apply. Each year, OSPI reports on progress made by the designated Innovation Schools and Zones.

UPDATE: Implementation of the New Student Transportation Funding System
In 2010, the state Legislature set the implementation deadline for a new student transportation funding system as September 1, 2014. This is the final quarterly report on the progress being made.

UPDATE: School Food Service Programs
The state Legislature annually provides more than $7 million for students who qualify for free and reduced-price meals. State funding is required for federal “match” money, which totals $300 million annually. This report summarizes funding to the four major child nutrition programs.

  • Authorizing bill/law: 3ESSB 5034, Sec. 506 (1)(d) [2013–15 Operating Budget]

UPDATE: Truancy Report
The total number of truancy petitions reported in 2013–14 decreased by 15.5 percent from 2012-13 for students in grades 1–8 and by 8.9 percent for students in grades 9–12. More clearly defined rules, definitions and reporting expectations from OSPI have helped districts better track and report truancy data. But without additional information, establishing causes for the statewide declines is not possible. This report updates the data collection for truancy.

UPDATE: Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Education
OSPI coordinates STEM education across the state. This report summarizes the actions taken in the past year to provide statewide coordination for math, science, and technology.

UPDATE: Transitional Bilingual Instruction Program (TBIP)
A total of 219 languages were spoken by students in Washington schools during the 2013–14 school year. The Transitional Bilingual Instruction Program (TBIP), which began in 1979, provides instruction for children who come from homes where English is not the primary language spoken. The 2013–15 Operating Budget provided additional funding for transitional academic support during the first two years after a student exits TBIP. This report provides data to evaluate student achievement of the new set of students.

Online Learning Annual Report
In the 2013–14 school year, more 23,000 Washington students enrolled in about 73,000 K–12 online courses. Both the number of students and the number of enrollments were essentially unchanged from the previous year. The number of districts reporting online enrollments increased, while the number of schools fell slightly.

Homeless Students Data
The federal McKinney-Vento Act requires all school districts to report annually the number of homeless students enrolled in schools. In Washington, that number has increased every year since McKinney-Vento was reauthorized in 2001. During the 2013–14 school year, 32,494 students were identified as homeless, which amounted to 3.1 percent of students statewide.

The State of Native Education
This report addresses the accomplishments and recommendations of the Office of Native Education, including the refined Since Time Immemorial Tribal Sovereignty Curriculum, expanded professional development, and State-Tribal Education Compacts.

UPDATE: Combined FTE Experience of Students Participating in the Running Start Program
The Running Start program allows high school juniors and seniors to attend institutions of higher education using state K−12 basic education dollars. For many years, those students were funded by the state as a 2.0 full-time equivalent. Beginning in 2011–12, funding was reduced to a maximum of 1.2 FTE per student. This report examines the effect the reduction has had on student course enrollment patterns in the high school and Running Start. The results are based on the three years of data available since the change.

  • Authorizing bill/law: 3ESSB 5034, Sec 502 (18) [2013–15 Operating Budget]