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Home » Policy & Funding » Grants & Grant Management » Every Student Succeeds Act » Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) » Private School Participation in Federal Programs

Private School Participation in Federal Programs

Participation in Federal Programs Webinar

OSPI’s Federal Program Equitable Services Ombudsmen hosted a webinar focusing on the requirements and procedures for school districts and private schools for the 2022–23 school year.

The students, parent/guardians, and educators of non-profit, private schools–approved by the Washington State Board of Education–may be eligible for services provided through some Elementary Secondary Education Act (ESEA) federal education programs. These services can provide a valuable supplement to the core programming and professional development of participating private schools.

District Requirements

Required Documentation for Initial Consultation

  1. Complete an Affirmation of Consultation for each participating private school.
  2. For private schools participating in Title I, Part A, complete the Title I, Part A Record of Agreed Upon Services.
  3. Districts must provide and explain the Complaint Procedures.

Services to Out-of-District Private Schools

Private School Requirements

To be eligible to participate in federal programs, private schools must be state-approved and non-profit. The yearly approval process is completed through the Washington State Board of Education.

Federal Program Participation

Sample Communications

Emergency Assistance to Non-Public Schools (EANS)

Review the EANS Frequently Asked Questions for questions related to the EANS program under the Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2021 (CRRSA Act). Congress reiterated the need for non-public schools to participate in emergency education relief programs by establishing a separate program under GEER, rather than relying on the equitable services requirements that typically apply to elementary and secondary formula grant programs.