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Agency Response:
Stop Confusing “Education Reform” With “Funding Reform”

The Legislature defined basic education. The Court said, Fund it.

OLYMPIA — March 28, 2014 — Unfortunately, it is once again necessary to respond to Ms. Liv Finne of the Washington Policy Center about the meaning of the Supreme Court’s McCleary v. State of Washington decision. Ms. Finne continues to say the Supreme Court has ordered the State to adopt education reforms and that the Court has not ordered the State to fund its program of education identified in ESHB 2261 and SHB 2776.

Funding Reform
Ms. Finne is wrong. Here is the order issued by the Court in January:

...it is hereby ordered: the State shall submit, no later than April 30, 2014 a complete plan for fully implementing its program of basic education for each school year between now and the 2017-18 school year. This plan must address each of the areas of K-12 education identified in ESHB 2261, as well as the implementation plan called for by SHB 2776, and must include a phase-in schedule for fully funding each of the components of basic education.

The order goes to the issue of funding reform, not education reform.

The Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction has no interest in continuing an argument with a private citizen. Ms. Finne and the Policy Center are certainly entitled to their opinions. But continuing to spread false information is not helpful as policy makers struggle to meet the Court’s order.

Education Reform
Superintendent Dorn supports education reform. In fact, he agrees with many reforms supported by Ms. Finne and the Policy Center, including:

Most of these reforms have been implemented, but that is beside the point. The Court did not link education reform and funding.

The Court ordered the Legislature to fully fund each component of basic education, as defined by the Legislature itself. The debate over various education reforms should not be used as an excuse to not address the constitutional necessity to fully fund our schools.

 

About OSPI
The Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) is the primary agency charged with overseeing K–12 education in Washington state. Led by State School Superintendent Randy Dorn, OSPI works with the state’s 295 school districts and nine educational service districts to administer basic education programs and implement education reform on behalf of more than one million public school students.

OSPI provides equal access to all programs and services without discrimination based on sex, race, creed, religion, color, national origin, age, honorably discharged veteran or military status, sexual orientation, gender expression or identity, the presence of any sensory, mental, or physical disability, or the use of a trained dog guide or service animal by a person with a disability. Questions and complaints of alleged discrimination should be directed to the Equity and Civil Rights Director at (360) 725-6162 or P.O. Box 47200, Olympia, WA 98504-7200.

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CONTACT:
Kristen Jaudon
Communications Specialist
360.725.6032 (o) | 360.481.9099 (c)

The OSPI Communications Office serves as the central point of contact for local, regional and national media covering K-12 education issues.

Communications Manager
Nathan Olson
(360) 725-6015

 

Old Capitol Building, PO Box 47200, 600 Washington St. S.E., Olympia, WA  98504-7200  (360) 725-6000  TTY (360) 664-3631
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